I am often asked whether I believe antidepressants can be of any help to a floxed person.  The answer is that I believe that SSRI’s can be beneficial to some after floxing, but like many medications, they can be a double edged sword, helping some and hindering others.  I have had contact with floxed folks who are adamantly against antidepressanttheir use and still others who have told me they could not have survived without them. Whatever your choice it is important to be very cautious for two important reasons.  The information is this article is from information provided to me by other floxed individuals and by my own experience. It is not intended to offer medical advice, just relay compiled information. Please read my disclaimer and consult your physician for any medical advice or care.

First, I believe the FQ’s can and do alter our brain chemistry by either damaging receptors or setting the stage for imbalances of neurotransmitters. From what I have read and my own personal experience, the GABA receptors and the acetylcholine receptors have had the most involvement, with serotonin and adenosine damage to a lesser degrees.  Consequently, we (the floxed) are particularly sensitive to changes in the chemicals that affect the neurotransmitters.

I believe when we try these drugs (SSRI’s, SNRI’s and any other drug that alters brain chemicals) we must start in much lower doses than the normal person.  This can be hard to get across to a doctor because they want to start at and build up to normal therapeutic doses  relatively quickly.  For example a non-floxed person may tolerate 30mg’s of Lexapro very well and yet a floxed person will get very ill from side effects at that level and should only be taking 5mg to 10mg. A floxed person however can get the full benefits from a lower dose than a non-floxed person at recommended therapeutic doses.

Second, I believe the FQ’s can and do damage the metabolic pathways in the liver that are responsible for processing certain drugs.  Many drugs that use the same pathways as the FQs did for clearance can, after floxing, have problems with drug serum levels (usually building too high).  A lot of the antidepressants use the same enzymatic pathway, again another reason why dosages should be given in smaller amounts under the watchful eye of a physician.  This doesn’t include those who have genetic predispositions for clearance issues.  Live pathways are highly polymorphic.  Which means that even without throwing the FQ’s in the mix, drug clearance varies greatly from person to person. So just be cause you have a normal liver function tests does not mean that you will not have issues clearing or metabolizing a drug from the body.

I have compiled through my own experience and the information from others the following information on antidepressants:

Please note that ALL antidepressants below can have insomnia as a side effect, especially while adjusting, so if you are prone to insomnia, they can aggravate your existing insomnia for short time.  For most, the side effect of insomnia wears off but for some it can be too aggravating to continue.


  • citalopram (Celexa): Some floxies I have talked to found this one helpful. It was reported as lightly sedating, will control anxiety and night time restlessness.  Effective against depression.  Possibly can help with some nerve pain. Withdrawal can be moderately unpleasant. (5mg to 10mg doses)
  • escitalopram (Lexapro): Some floxies I have talked to found this one helpful. It was reported as lightly sedating, will control anxiety and nighttime restlessness.  Effective against depression.  Withdrawal can be  moderately unpleasant. (5mg to 10mg doses)
  • fluoxetine (Prozac):  Not recommended by the floxies I have talked to because it is too excitatory in nature and can severely aggravate insomnia and anxiety. Withdrawal is easy.
  • fluvoxamine (Luvox):  No information from floxies.
  • paroxetine (Paxil): Some floxies have had limited success with Paxil reporting it as generally sedating, and will control anxiety and night time restlessness.  Effective against depression.  Withdrawal can be very  unpleasant. (5mg to 10mg doses)
  • sertraline (Zoloft): Info from floxies report Zoloft as too aggravating to insomnia and nerve pain in floxies.Withdrawal can be moderately unpleasant.
  • zimelidine (Zelmid, Normud): No information from  floxies.


  • venlafaxine (Effexor) –  No positive reports from floxies on this antidepressant. Most floxies report it as having the most severe withdrawals, also known as discontinuation syndrome, plus a litany of side effects while taking the medication. Some withdrawals have taken six months or longer.
  • vesvenlafaxine (Pristiq)[2] – Same reports as Effexor.
  • duloxetine (Cymbalta)-  Some floxies have reported limited success with Cymbalta saying it can help with nerve pain, and anxiety control. Conversely  some report it has caused come joint pain and some withdrawals issues. Can be hard on liver so use should be closely monitored. Withdrawal can severe for some.


  • mirtazapine (Remeron): Some floxies have report  that this was very good against their depression.  Some help with anxiety in some patients, while others reported an increase in anxiety.  They used smaller doses 7.5 mg to 15mg. Withdrawal fairly easy.

Atypical antidepressants:

  • bupropion (Wellbutrin): Floxies have reported this as too aggravating to insomnia.  I have no reports on anyone who successfully continued with this medication for a long time.

Low and Slow

It is a motto I live by since being floxed. If you are concerned, tell you doctor that you believe (or if you know for sure) that you are a poor metabolizer of drugs.  Most physicians will allow you to start slowly with a smaller amount so that you can monitor yourself for any troublesome side effects, should they occur.

This information is obviously my own opinion and is based on data that I have compiled by after talking to those damaged by flouroquinolones and have tried antidepressants for help.  Obviously everyone’s physiology is different and drugs affect each person differently, so these choices may or may not apply to you. Please talk to your doctor about medication choices.

Share this post on:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather
Follow MyQuinStory on:
facebooktwitterpinterestrssyoutubetumblrby feather


...damaged by fluoroquinolones in 2007 at age 46. Prior to, a healthy law enforcement official. Now an amateur FQ researcher, author, and blogger.

You may also like...

6 Responses

  1. Compras says:

    I am unquestionably bookmarking this web site and sharing it with my friends. You will be getting plenty of visitors to your web site from me!

  2. Floxedspouse says:

    Hi David — great site. I am in a process of developing one myself for my husband who was floxed slightly under 1 year ago after contracting cellulitis on a vacation we were taking exactly one year ago… anyway, regarding some anti-depressants: another reason to be careful: fluoridated drugs. Specifically fluoxetine (Prozac) is a fluoridated drug JUST like our favorite antibiotic class we love to hate. Floxies should be careful about ALL fluoride intake but especially in another daily dosed drug.

  3. Bruce says:

    Thank you for this information. Any information that we can share with one another to help us make decisions is worth while.

  4. Omar says:

    Asperger’s syndrome is also linked to weakened GABA function and increased gut sensitivity. I was also on Levaquin when my symptoms worsened.

    I’m thinking that Levaquin may not have an effect on people with healthy guts, but those of us who were already sensitive were given a whammy.

  5. Justin says:

    I personally would strongly recommend against antidepressants: like FQs, they can cause severe and in fact permanent side-effects. In fact, the manufacturers of celexa are not only aware that their drug can cause permanent side-effects, they proudly market this fact in their literature (of course they are talking about a “beneficial” side-effect but this shows they are aware that permanent changes to the brain are happening). Up to 70% of patients on antideprssants experience some form of sexual dysfunction and an unlucky few will, like us FQ victims, develop *SEVERE* sexual dysfunction which doesn’t go away after you stop taking the drug.

  6. Candie says:

    Here is an Index of Fluorinated Pharmaceuticals (including anti-depressants and anti-anxiety drugs). This may be helpful in making a choice.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>


WordPress Anti Spam by WP-SpamShield