NO. Fluoroquinolone toxicity creates a syndrome. It is a novel syndrome that mimics many disease processes, such as MS, Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, etc… Yet, even though it mimics other disease processes, it also sets itself apart in many areas as well as many sufferers experience wider ranging and more intense symptoms than many with organic disease processes.

Due to lack of research and guidance form the FDA many doctors are woefully ignorant to FQ toxicity and the syndrome that it causes. There needs to be intensive academic research that defines the causal mechanisms and damages that manifest after and adverse event.

The FQ’s can and do damage and exert pressure in several different ways. First, they have the ability to cause direct DNA damage. Second, they have the ability to exert tremendous epigenetic pressure thereby ‘switch on or off’ genes and creating a pathogenic process. Third, they set the state for extreme states of oxidative stress that damages cell structures and influences gene selection. Fourth, they can directly damage delicate cellular structures such as lysosomes, cell membranes, and external and internal cellular proteins responsible for cellular communication. These are just some of the more prevalent ways that FQ’s do damage to the human body.

I have seen genetic results from literally dozens of floxed folks, and at this time it would appear that there is no clear genetic predispositions to floxing, including MTHFR.  How do we know this?  We have seen the genetic tests from severely floxed folks who have had no mutually shared genetic markers.   There is some indications that certain CYP polymorphisms may lead to more extensive metabolization in some individuals.  This is a strong possibility that needs further research.

There has also been rumors that DNA adductions are the root universal cause of floxing.  Again, at this time, this has been proven false by comparisons of mass spec results of known severely floxed folks in addition to consultations with a leading geneticist who cautions that something much more than adduction is at work with this damage process.

Because of this there is no ‘one test’ that conclusively detects FQ damage. It’s possible to indirectly catch FQ damage via testing the reveals malfunctioning metabolic processes. Often times however, the patient will have normal standard testing. Doctors are often befuddled and many end up dismissing patients, diagnosing a psychological disorder, or haphazardly diagnosing a common catch-all such as Fibromyalgia.  This further victimizes the sufferer.

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