Know Your Genes – The GSTP1 Gene

Known as Glutathione S-transferases (GST) the GSTP1 are a family of enzymes that play an important role in detoxification of certain products of xenobiotics and carcinogens such as heavyGSTP1 Gewne metals, herbicides, solvents, pesticides, steroids and many other harmful pathogens.  GSTP1 is primarily located in your brain and lungs. GST detoxifies by linking toxic compounds with glutathione (GSH), thus forming a less reactive substance.

Polymorphisms with GSTP1 A114V & I105V are associated with higher or lower enzyme activity, depending on the exposure.  Some individuals with these variations can expend (GSH) too fast resulting in a buildup of toxic substances. GSTP1 genotypes are associated with increased risk of various cancers that is compounded by exposure to cigarette smoke.

Some health professionals recommend individuals with GSTP1 SNP’s minimize their exposure to cigarette smoke, charred food, herbicides, fungicides, insect sprays, industrial solvents, and toxic metals.   In addition to ensure GSH support it is important to supply GSH precursors and cofactor such as, methionine, NAC, glutamine, glycine, magnesium, and pyridoxal-5-phosphate (B6). It is possible to reduce GSH depletion by supplementing with alpha lipoic acid, milk thistle, and taurine.   Certain foods such as onions, leeks, garlic, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts, and radish can increase GST activity.   It is always recommended to consume an antioxidant-rich diet to prevent oxidative stress.

Many individuals cannot tolerate certain foods or supplements so it is vitally important to know that when treating deficiencies associated with this and other genes, the skilled eye of a health professional trained in the interaction of genes, combined with the patient’s current health be consulted.

Also of interest:

 

Know Your Genes – The ACAT Gene

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...damaged by fluoroquinolones in 2007 at age 46. Prior to, a healthy law enforcement official. Now an amateur FQ researcher, author, and blogger.

9 Responses

  1. Cris says:

    Which is the risk allele? My daughter has AA for the Rs1695 SNP.

  2. admin says:

    From my information, gathered from the MTHFR community, the risk allele is considered ‘G’ for RS1695.

    David

  3. I’ve been looking for someone who understands the relationship between the GSTP1 gene homozygous mutation and how to treat it with a homozygous CBS 699T mutation- which I have. It creates a problem in that the body needs sulfur to help the GST pathway but I cannot tolerate sulfur b/c of the CBS mutation. Any ideas or know someone who can help? I’m trying to treat Lyme and somehow find a safe way to detoxify from heavy metal issues.

  4. Michael (NW) says:

    Hi, testing shows I have a high need for glutathione. And need to avoid common Vitamin E (GSTPQ G AA: 2/2). Yes, I have CBS – – which means I shouldn’t have foods containing sulfur. Catch 22? Or, is my CBS not functioning well due to lack of certain nutrients, or…. So, not sure what to do. Not sure what “AA” means for sure. Anyone have any experience with this? Could use some insight. Thanks.

  5. Erica Muller says:

    Hello, Like the others above I have the CBS mutation also (homo) which means I also have to decrease my sulfur intake. How do I treat this mutation (also homo) and that one at the same time when they seem to be polar opposites?

    • Allyson says:

      Hi Erica,
      I don’t know if you’ve already found an answer but Bob Miller from Tree of Life is an expert in genetic nutrition and the best I’ve seen on this topic.

  6. Heni says:

    Im in the same box as the above. Any help would be appreciated as due to many other food sensitivities & resistant gut infections my diet has become very restricted. Thanks.

  1. January 12, 2015

    […] Some health professionals recommend individuals with GSTP1 SNP’s minimize their exposure to cigarette smoke, charred food, herbicides, fungicides, insect sprays, industrial solvents, and toxic metals. In addition to ensure GSH support it is important to supply GSH precursors and cofactor such as, methionine, NAC, glutamine, glycine, magnesium, and pyridoxal-5-phosphate (B6). It is possible to reduce GSH depletion by supplementing with alpha lipoic acid, milk thistle, and taurine.   Certain foods such as onions, leeks, garlic, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts, and radish can increase GST activity.   It is always recommended to consume an antioxidant-rich diet to prevent oxidative stress..[link] […]

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